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Kyrgyzstan
Overview

Kyrgyzstan Overview

Summary:

The Fund first aided Kyrgyzstan after inter-ethnic violence and political crisis erupted in 2010 with a package of $10 million for activities covering the transition until elections in November 2011. In September 2013, the Fund approved $15.1 million priority plan under the PRF modality. In late 2014 PBF approved an additional $1.6m for two Immediate Response Facility projects in line with Secretary General’s Seven-Point Action Plan on Gender Responsive Peacebuilding. In late 2015, a $3million cross-border project with Tajikistan was approved ($1.6m for Kyrgyzstan and $1.4m for Tajikistan).

Total funding support in US$:  US$ 28 Million

Focus of PBF support:

Project name Focus Period Budget RUNOs
Peace and reconciliation through strengthening the rule of law and human rights The project capacitates state institutions, selected LSGs, and citizens in selected LGSs to ensure the implementation of policies and local peacebuilding initiatives that reduce local inequalities, divisions and conflict, which will result in increased trust between different communities, and between communities and central and local authorities Feb 2014 – Sept 2016 $1m OHCHR
Improving the rule of law and access to justice for sustainable peace The project supports the creation of a legal framework for sustainable peace in Kyrgyzstan by strengthening the rule of law and equal access to justice. Its activities focus on key reforms delivering in the country and positively influencing on changes in the field of peacebuilding in accordance with the Constitution, national priorities and international standards in the field of human rights. Feb 2014 – Sept 2016 $1m UNDP
Building a Constituency for Peace The project works towards promoting gender equality by involving young women in all aspects of public life and economic activity, and by building support systems to ensure their rights. The project focuses on bridging ethnic divisions by promoting equal opportunity regardless of ethnic origin, by facilitating side-by-side leaning of life- and livelihood skills and by actively building knowledge of how to be a good citizen based on respecting diversity. Dec 2013 – Sept 2016 $1.6m UNWOMEN
Strengthening capacities of LSGs for peacebuilding The project supports effective interaction between local self – governments with other public authorities, civil society and local population on interethnic harmony issues and conflict prevention. Dec 2013 – Sept 2016 $1.7m UNICEF, UNDP
Youth for peaceful changes (Outcome 2) The project will promote equal opportunities for youth to positively engage in society, also giving them opportunities to voice their grievances. Youth will acquire practical skills during the delivery of the youth work curriculum, implementation of youth action plans and livelihoods mentoring. Vulnerable young women and young men at-risk will have better civic participation skills to positively engage in society. Additionally relevant institutions will have the capacity to replicate the delivery of the youth work curricula elsewhere. Feb 2014 – Sept 2016 $0.6m UNDP UNICEF UNFPA
Youth for peaceful changes (Outcome 3) The same as Outcome 2 Youth for peaceful change project Feb 2014 – Sept 2016 $0.9m UNDP UNICEF UNFPA
Unity in diversity This project aims to promote multilingualism in Kyrgyzstan, to foster an environment enabling broader integration, especially of minorities while promoting protection of their rights. Multilingual education and multicultural initiatives will target all age groups and genders (with special focus on youth and women) in order to break down stereotypes and forms of discrimination. It will support the state language as an integrative tool at all levels of education system. Dec 2013 – Sept 2016 $3.4m UNICEF, OHCHR
Media for peace The project supports young journalists and media organizations to produce media outputs that reach mass audiences on critical peacebuilding topics. This also includes programmes produced in majority and minority languages. Apr 2015 – Aug 2016 $0.3m UNDP
PBF Secretariat PBF Secretariat June 2013 – Sept 2016 $0.9m UNDP
Women as Peaceful Voters & Women as Candidates The project aims at increasing women’s participation, including from minorities and youth groups, at elections, both as candidates and peaceful voters, in priority geographic areas under currently ongoing PRF projects. Jan 2015 – Dec 2016 $1.0m UNDP UNICEF
Building the evidence base to facilitate responsive gender policy and programs for equality and lasting peace The Gender in Society Perceptions Study will identify critical threats to gender equality and potential conflict triggers, in order to establish a credible, reliable evidence base for informed, targeted policymaking and programming for equitable gender outcomes. Mar 2015 – Sept 2016 $0.6m UNWOMEN IOM UNFPA
Cross-border Cooperation for Sustainable Peace and Development The project aims to increase cooperation and trust between communities in pilot Tajik-Kyrgyz village clusters towards mitigating immediate risks of renewed cross-border violence. Dec 2015 -June 2017 Kyrgyzstan: $1.4mTajikistan: $1.6m FAO UNICEF WFP UNDP

Overview of PBF support and results:

The fierce outbreak of ethnic violence that hit southern Kyrgyzstan in June 2010 had a devastating impact on hundreds of thousands of people of both Uzbek and Kyrgyz ethnicity, and cast a pall over relations with all ethnic groups. In response to the violence, PBF approved a package of IRF support of $10 million in 2011 for activities covering the transition until elections in November 2011. The package of support was focussed on empowerment and reconciliation of communities in the south with a specific focus on youth and women, infrastructures for peace and administration of justice.

Looking at the results of the first phase of projects over time, when a baseline survey was done in 2011, 61 percent of people said they felt “safe” or “rather safe”; in 2013, a countrywide survey found that this had increased to 82 percent. Many factors have no doubt contributed to this progress, and results achieved by PBF-supported projects suggest that they have helped.  As a leading example, the Office of the President was supported to draft a policy on national unity and interethnic relations.

In 2012, President Atambaev requested additional, longer-term assistance through PRF. The Secretary-General declared Kyrgyzstan eligible for further PBF support in November 2012. In September 2013, PBSO approved $15.1 million priority plan under the PRF modality. From late 2013, the PRF support focuses on (a) the rule of law, justice and human rights; (b) local self-governance and peacebuilding; and (c) multilingual education and civic identity. Twelve projects, including secretariat support, corresponding to the three outcomes have been approved by the JSC and implemented by the RUNOs.

Programmatic Details of the Priority Plan

Outcome 1. Critical laws, policies, reforms and recommendations of human rights mechanisms, including UPR, are implemented to uphold the rule of law, improve access to justice and respect, protect and fulfill human rights. 

Lack of fair judiciary has been identified as one of the conflict triggers in Kyrgyzstan. To address this issue, UN agencies contributed to the ongoing judicial reform process by supporting the review and update of a legal framework. In particular the following legislation has been reviewed\reworked: Criminal Code, Code on Misdemeanours, Criminal Procedure Code, Criminal Executive Code, Civil Procedure Code, Laws on enforcement proceedings, State guaranteed legal aid and Law on status of judges. This support was acknowledged by the Secretariat of the Council for Judicial Reform. PBF funding has been critical for preparing a draft concept paper on the national legal awareness led by the Ministry of Justice. The reform of key policies and legislations were elaborated, resulting in the development of 7 laws and incorporation of human rights in criminal code. Some of new approaches were integrated in State Policies including committing the police to strengthen dialogue with local communities to enhance public trust.

Outcome 2. Local self-government bodies, in partnership with related state institutions, and civil society, bridge divisions and reduce local tensions.

To reduce vulnerability of young people, an agricultural livelihood module is being delivered in schools and integrated into the national curriculum. Professional youth work is being introduced to municipalities. Local Self-Governance (LSG) bodies partnered with communities (including minority groups, youth, women, religious leaders/ organizations; and potential ‘trouble makers’) to design and implement actions / local development plans (based on local conflict analysis) that built trust between them and contribute to the reduction of local tensions and better/ equal access to services. In order to facilitate this process, projects built capacities of local leaders, communities and authorities. Grievance and local conflict resolution mechanisms have been strengthened. Gender based violence standard operating procedures were promoted among authorities. Tolerance was promoted through community outreach and media. A monitoring centre under the Agency for LSG bodies was set-up to identify and respond to local tensions.

Outcome 3. Policies, pilot initiatives and approaches are developed and implemented that enable the further development of a common civic identity, multilingual education and respect for diversity and minority rights.

A working group in the Ministry of Education and Science was established to revise the policy and normative framework to make it conducive for implementation of Multi-Lingual Education (MLE) models, and to align it with national and international policies and standards. A decree on piloting MLE in target schools was issued and regulations on MLE developed. Discussions with authorities on possible measures to increase minority representation in public life and law enforcement are on-going. National Commission on State Language expressed interest to increase minority representation. Capacity building efforts, that begun towards professionalizing youth work in pilot communities, have contributed to the development of youth skills, already enabling youth to collaborate across ethnic divides to plan peacebuilding activities. Youth workers started introducing new services for their peers in target communities. Forum theatre performances promoted tolerance and respect for human rights.

The JSC not only functions as a platform for discussions that can offer practical ways for achieving PPP outcomes but also has contributed to establishing linkages among various government institutions, civil society and donor organizations in their joint response to peacebuilding issues. One example – development partners have adopted the PPP indicators to measure the country’s progress in terms of peacebuilding, beyond PBF investment. Better coherence and coordination in the peacebuilding process has been ensured through regular JSC meetings, information sharing and participation in peacebuilding activities. The JSC’s Oversight Groups actively monitor implementation of projects and provide recommendation to the JSC. The PRF will expire at the end of 2016, while the IRF projects will continue into 2017. A final evaluation of the PRF is scheduled for Q4 of 2016.

In late 2014, PBF approved an additional $1.6m for two IRF projects under GPI2. The “Women as Peaceful Voters & Women as Candidates” project aims at increasing women’s participation, including from minorities and youth groups, in elections both as candidates and peaceful voters, in priority geographic areas under currently ongoing PRF projects. The “Building the evidence base to facilitate responsive gender policy and programs for equality and lasting peace” project is a study project to identify critical threats to gender equality and potential conflict triggers, in order to establish a credible, reliable evidence base for informed, targeted policymaking and programming for equitable gender outcomes.

Most recently, PBSO approved the “Cross-border Cooperation for Sustainable Peace and Development” project, in line with the PBF’s commitment to address regional conflict dynamics and recommendations of the AGE Report. The project aims to increase cooperation and trust between communities in pilot Tajik-Kyrgyz village clusters towards mitigating immediate risks of renewed cross-border violence.

 

Key documents:

(Updated February  2015)

Quarterly reports for each project are available on the MPTF-O Gateway site

Key Figures

Participating Organizations' 2011 expenditure reports are not yet posted. Expected 30 April of 2012, subject to timely reporting.

Participating Organizations

Budget

Key Figures
  • Budget:
  • Transfers:
  • Expenditures:
  • $10 m
  • $10 m
  • $3.89 m
Updates
Documents

Quarterly reports for each project are available on the MPTF-O Gateway site